Happier at Home

Happier at Home

Kiss More, Jump More, Abandon A Project, Read Samuel Johnson, and My Other Experiments in the Practice of Everyday Life

eBook - 2012
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Tolstoy wrote, "Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." This is the statement that inspired bestselling author Gretchen Rubin to wonder whether she could foster an even greater happiness in her home. During The Happiness Project , the same questions kept tugging at her. How can I raise happy children? How can I maintain a tender, romantic relationship with my spouse--after fifteen years of marriage? How do I keep my Blackberry from taking over my private life? How can I foster a well-ordered, light-hearted atmosphere in my house, when no one else will lift a finger to cooperate?

This book is Gretchen's account of her second journey in pursuit of happiness. Prescriptive, easy-to-follow, and anecdotal, Happier at Home offers readers a way of thinking and being that is positive and life-affirming. With specific examples following the calendar year, an intimate voice, and drawing from science and pop culture, this book will resonate with anyone looking to strengthen the bonds of family.

Publisher: New York : Crown Archetype, 2012
ISBN: 9780385670838
Characteristics: 1 online resource ; 320 pages.
Additional Contributors: OverDrive, Inc

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sarwordel1
Feb 12, 2019

I think I would've been better off reading Rubin's other book, The Happiness Project. This book kept my interest for only the first couple chapters. What interested me were the happiness "truths" that the author learned from their first happiness project. She keeps referring to them throughout this book, but does not explain them in detail, or how to apply them to your own life.

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writermala
Sep 18, 2015

At first I felt this book was not as good as 'the happiness project;' but soon I realized the value of this one. I guess I'd expected it to be more humorous than it was. The books did make some very astute comments like "working is the most dangerous form of procrastination." So true in this techno age.

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MindyTureau
Nov 15, 2013

I assumed that this book would be filled with actual advice for making oneself happier in the home. Instead, it was a bunch of random thoughts and quirky, off-the-mark anecdotes. While it did motivate me to purge my home of things I didn't need, and to get my office more organized, overall it just frustrated me. Most of her stories are about attempting to sit and write about happiness while being distracted by her children and ignoring her husband. This book is practically a blog.

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salsaladybug
May 24, 2013

Gretchen is very honest and down to earth...just like normal people. Her book was very helpful and enlightening. It motivated me to get organized and clean out a lot of unwanted clutter. I just needed a push.

ChristchurchLib Jan 24, 2013

"...It’s that “happier” that is the key. Because Rubin is already happy at home. She has a supportive husband, two lovely daughters, a very good job, no money problems, is more than passably good looking and appears to be in robust good health. Some of you nay-sayers out there will already be thinking: 'V for Vomit – she is altogether too perfect for my poor tattered little life'..." Read more about "Happier at Home" in our blog post http://cclblog.wordpress.com/2013/01/25/happier-at-home/

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