Rabbit Is Rich

Rabbit Is Rich

Book - 1996
Average Rating:
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Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award
nbsp;
The hero of John Updike's Rabbit, Run, ten years after the events of Rabbit Redux, has come to enjoy considerable prosperity as the chief sales representative of Springer Motors, a Toyota agency in Brewer, Pennsylvania. The time is 1979: Skylab is falling, gas lines are lengthening, and double-digit inflation coincides with a deflation of national self-confidence. Nevertheless, Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom feels in good shape, ready to enjoy life at last--until his wayward son, Nelson, returns from the West, and the image of an old love pays a visit to the lot. New characters and old populate these scenes from Rabbit's middle age as he continues to pursue, in his zigzagging fashion, the rainbow of happiness.

Publisher: New York : Fawcett Columbine, 1996
Edition: 1st Ballantine Books trade pbk. ed
ISBN: 9780449911822
0449911829
Branch Call Number: UPDI
Characteristics: 423 p. ; 21 cm

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lukasevansherman
Nov 05, 2013

For the younger reader (let's say under 45), John Updike can be intimidating (or irritating) due to the sheer volume of his output, which includes essays, short stories, criticism and 22 novels. He's the literary equivalent of Woody Allen in that he seems to think that the producing a huge body of work his guarantee his inclusion in the canon. The Rabbit tetralogy is maybe his most famous work and this is the third in the series. The titular character is a dull WASP who eats, drinks, screws (there is a lot of sex) and worries about his car dealership, investments, mortgages and the price of gas. It's well-written, but good luck feeling anything towards the characters. Typical sentence: "But things look up in the afternoon, after a couple of pina coladas and a crabmeat-salad sandwich." I feel he should have either treated them with more sympathy or more humor. It is a pretty dirty book though (pgs. 218, 305, 414). Seriously some of this stuff would make Caligula blush. Followed by "Rabbit at Rest."

p
photogrrlkp
Apr 28, 2011

John Updike is a great writer. That being said, I really didn't like the "Rabbit" books, mostly because I couldn't muster up any sympathetic feelings for any of the characters. It seemed like all the books contained a never-ending stream of horrible behavior and endless justification and blaming of others. Not enjoyable to me.

g
GrumpyDave
Dec 11, 2010

1982 National Book Award - Fiction

1982 Pulitzer Prize - Fiction

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