River Thieves

River Thieves

Book - 2001
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In elegant, sensual prose, Michael Crummey crafts a haunting tale set in Newfoundland at the turn of the nineteenth century. A richly imagined story about love, loss and the heartbreaking compromises -- both personal and political -- that undermine lives, River Thieves is a masterful debut novel. To be published in Canada and the United States, it joins a wave of classic literature from eastern Canada, including the works of Alistair MacLeod, Wayne Johnston and David Adams Richards, while resonating at times with the spirit of Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain and Cormac McCarthy's Border Trilogy. British naval officer David Buchan arrives on the Bay of Exploits in 1810 with orders to establish friendly contact with the elusive Beothuk, the aboriginal inhabitants known as "Red Indians" who have been driven almost to extinction. Aware that the success of his mission rests on the support of local white settlers, Buchan approaches the most influential among them, the Peytons, for assistance, and enters a shadowy world of allegiances and deep grudges. His closest ally, the young John Peyton Jr., maintains an uneasy balance between duty to his father -- a powerful landowner with a reputation as a ruthless persecutor of the Beothuk - and his troubled conscience. Cassie Jure, the self-reliant, educated and secretive woman who keeps the family house, walks a precarious line of her own between the unspoken but obvious hopes of the younger Peyton, her loyalty to John Senior, and a determination to maintain her independence. When Buchan's peace expedition goes horribly awry, the rift between father and son deepens. With a poetic eye and a gift for storytelling, Crummey vividly depicts the stark Newfoundland backcountry. He shows the agonies of the men toiling towards the caribou slaughtering yards of the Beothuk; of coming upon the terrible beauty of Red Indian Lake, its frozen valley lit up by the sunset like "a cathedral lit with candles"; then retreating through rotten ice that slices at clothing and skin as they flee the disaster. He breathes life into the rich vernacular of the time and place, and with colourful detail brings us intimately into a world of haying and spruce beer, of seal meat and beaver pelts: a world where the first governor of Newfoundland to die in office is sent back to England preserved in "a large puncheon of rum". Years later, when the Peytons' second expedition to the Beothuks' winter camp leads to the kidnapping of an Indian woman and a murder, Buchan returns to investigate. As the officer attempts to uncover what really happened on Red Indian Lake, the delicate web of allegiance, obligation and debt that holds together the Peyton household and the community of settlers on the northeast shore slowly unravels. The interwoven histories of English and French, Mi'kmaq and Beothuk, are slowly unearthed, as the story culminates with a growing sense of loss -- the characters' private regrets echoed in the tragic loss of an entire people. An enthralling story of passion and suspense, River Thieves captures both the vast sweep of history and the intimate lives of a deeply emotional and complex cast of characters caught in its wake. Many historical events which provided inspiration for the novel took place around where Crummey grew up. There was a family of Peytons in the Bay of Exploits who were intimately involved in the fate of the Beothuk, John the Elder known as a 'great Indian killer' and his son, John the Younger, attempting to establish friendly contact. "What set of circumstances would account for this difference?" asked Crummey. "How would the two men relate to one another? What would the motivations be for their particular actions? As soon as a writer begi
Publisher: Toronto : Doubleday Canada, 2001
ISBN: 9780385658102
0385658109
9780385658171
Branch Call Number: CRUM
Characteristics: 335 p

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ledft37
Oct 21, 2011

I read this book a couple of years ago. Then found Michael was to be the resource author on A circumnavigation cruise of
Newfoundland I re-read and 2nd time was magic. There is such depth of character and 2nd time did not lose track of them.
Met Michael on cruise and found him to be a quiet, introspective young man with great knowledge, interest and love of Newfoundland and its' people..

v
vcc
Oct 01, 2011

This was a hard-to-follow, boring read. I was interested to read about the Beothuk, but lost interest when I lost track of the characters' names.

m2 Feb 03, 2011

Beautifully written fiction about very early Canadian history. Centers on the extinction of one group of Native Americans and how immigrants contributed to their demise. Compelling reading -- complex characters.

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JMJourney
Mar 13, 2012

River Thieves is a beautifully written and compelling novel that breathes life into the pivotal events which shaped relations between the Beothuk Indians of Newfoundland and European settlers. Following a series of expeditions made under the order of the British Crown, the reader witnesses the tragic fallout from these missions as the Beothuk vanish and the web of secrets guarded by the settlers slowly begin to unravel …Told in elegant sensual prose this is an enthralling historical novel of great passion and suspense, driven by the extraordinary cast of characters. And with it Michael Crummey establishes himself as one of Canada’s most exciting new talents.

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